Manga Terminal, Tornio

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The Manga LNG natural gas import terminal in Röyttä, Tornio, is a joint venture of the industrial companies Outokumpu and SSAB Europe, the energy company EPV Energy and the LNG company Skangas. The purpose of the terminal is to diversify the gas and fuel markets of the Northern region by providing Northern industry, energy production and maritime transport with a more environmentally friendly and inexpensive alternative.

Wärtsilä has been responsible for construction delivery for the Manga liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal project. Wärtsilä’s turnkey solution for the terminal also includes systems for LNG ship unloading, LNG storage, ship bunkering, LNG truck loading, and LNG regasification and injection into the local gas network. 

LNG will be delivered flexibly to customers
The terminal's LNG storage capacity is 50,000 cbm. LNG will be delivered to customers in the Röyttä industrial area in gasified form via a connection pipeline and to industrial customers and filling stations by road using road tankers. Ships will mainly receive road tanker deliveries or will be bunkered directly from the terminal. 

Once completed, the Tornio LNG terminal will serve the entire Bay of Bothnia region as well as industrial and mining operators, maritime transport and heavy-duty road transport in Northern Finland, Sweden and Norway. The main users of LNG will include the Outokumpu Tornio steel mill, EPV Energy and SSAB Raahe. Maritime transport customers will include LNG-powered cargo ships and the new icebreaker Polaris.

The gas will arrive at Tornio from sources in the Skangas production portfolio such as the Risavika LNG production plant in Norway and other sources. The LNG will be delivered to Tornio by the Skangas parent company Gasum’s time-chartered 18,000 cbm Ice Class 1A Super tanker Coral EnergICE.

The commercial use of the import terminal will begin in summer 2018. Once completed, the terminal will be the largest LNG terminal in the Nordic countries and the second LNG terminal in Finland.